Saturday, May 18, 2024
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Otter Attacks and Severely Mauls 3 Women Floating Montana River

Nature’s Warning for Outdoor Tourists: River Otter Attack Leaves Three Women Injured

We’ve heard stories of outdoor tourists behaving badly, snapping and causing problems for nature. It’s so common that there’s even an Instagram account dedicated to calling out tourist morons who routinely throw caution to the wind, putting themselves and wildlife in danger.

Rare Otter Attacks: River Otters Can Be Protective of Themselves and Their Young

River otters might be cute AF, but these fuzzy little gangsters are members of the weasel family. They have razor-like claws, strong teeth, and powerful jaws that their prey includes tough-shelled mollusks.

Attack on Innertubes in Montana’s Jefferson River

On August 3rd, three women were celebrating Jen Royce’s birthday by floating on innertubes in Montana’s Jefferson River. Their evening turned violent when a river otter attacked them, inflicting serious injuries to all three.

Friendly Reminder: Give Wildlife Space

MFWP advises outdoor enthusiasts to give all wildlife plenty of space to avoid dangerous encounters. They also recommend “If you are attacked by an otter, fight back, get away and out of the water, and seek medical attention.”

The Aftermath: A Harrowing Survival Situation

Jen Royce, Stephanie, and Leila found themselves in a serious survival situation after being viciously attacked by the river otter. The women were covered in blood, and it continued to pour out of their faces and noses.

Emergency Services Challenges

Due to their remote location, emergency services faced challenges in locating the women. One of them made the tough decision to leave her companions and run more than two miles to the road to attempt to flag them down.

A Symbolic Light at the End of the Tunnel

The women’s prayers were finally answered when they saw red and blue lights moving through the dark canyon. One of the women made it to her companions, while the other was clinging to a rock in the river, afraid to move because they didn’t know where the otter had gone.

A Long Road to Recovery

Royce hitched a helicopter ride from the scene to the Bozeman Health Deaconess Regional Medical Center. Her friends received medical treatment at the scene and were then transported to the same hospital.

Healing from the Brutal Experience

Although Royce’s body is on the mend, she’s still dealing with the psychological wounds from the otter attack. She says that “I would say [the emotional wound] will be the wound that takes the longest to heal.”

Lesson Learned: Respect Nature and Keep Your Distance

MFWP advises outdoor enthusiasts to give all wildlife plenty of space to avoid dangerous encounters. “If you are attacked by an otter, fight back, get away and out of the water, and seek medical attention.”